An Ex-Teen Reconsiders The Privacy Status Option

I’ve personally noticed in the past week that kids have more options these days for social networking, and every once in a while it gets scary. I know that this isn’t entirely new, but through a few personal experiences, it’s been drawn to my attention in more prominent manner as of late. My little brother is a pro at taking pictures of himself using his camera phone, and a few other pre-teens I know have taken to online dating. Dating?

Now, when I was a teenager, social networking made up a good portion of my time, especially as it had begun to really pick up steam just as I was getting ready to trek off to college. Back then we didn’t really have private profile status options, or niche networks to choose what type of information went where. And as a teenager, I was fully aware that “putting myself out there” was somewhat risky business, but I still wasn’t fully cognizant of what all that meant.

When it came down to it, I was probably sharing more information than I needed to. Teens are far more aware these days, but parents still have a growing concern over the amount of information that their kids are placing on the web, even if it’s in the for of an image, and not always a direct phrase or set of data that would be immediately recognized as personally identifiable data.

social-network-teens.png

So are me and my friends just getting older and wiser, and have kids these days learned from our mistakes? Then again, it could just be the “phase” excuse, where teens do things that the rest of us don’t understand, and we call it a phase, hoping they’ll grow out of it. Just like we used to shop at Spencers and PacSun, we would now rather head over to Macy’s and Brooks Brothers. But will things like additional status options for social networks solve the problem?

There are a few additional issues to look at as well, one of which is the fact that giving teens the options doesn’t mean they’ll take them. In response to such attitudes, which could lead to a bit of “mommy and daddy know best” reactions, there has been a good amount of regulation in conjunction with th social networking providers themselves to protect the youngsters.

How far will that go, especially as social networking now extends across devices, in multiple manifestations, such as mobile hand-helds and video games? While I regret to see such a strong push for increased regulation (like permission slips), I am interested to see how the powers that be will further respond to the rapid ways in which social networking options make their way into every corner of our lives.

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6 thoughts on “An Ex-Teen Reconsiders The Privacy Status Option

  1. Awesome topic.

    While I won’t argue that minors are acting progressively more adult. I think the reason this trend seems so much more prominent now than in the past is because of the proximity at which we observe it.

    Within social networks there are no generational gaps, everyone’s a peer.

  2. Many times I have pleaded with some kids to take information OFF their profiles because they were giving out TOO much information. After I told them why they had to stop then they said, oh…that makes sense.

    Honestly, I wish their was some type of police force out here. It truly is alarming at what I see sometimes.

    I did watch the PBS Show frontline about this topic and they had some great tips of what you should and should not be doing:

    http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/kidsonline/safe/

  3. oi eu sou do brasil ,campo belo,minas gerais ja ouviu falar?
    pois é num entendi nada do q ta escrito ai em cima bein.o que vale é a intenção.
    by girl

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